Friday, July 23, 2010

New Ufo movie - Battle of Los Angeles

Keep an eye out for this new film hitting cinemas in 2011 - the Battle of Los Anegeles. Based on the true story of the real 1942 Ufo attack in Los Angeles which i have written about over the years  .
Hopefully the hollywood movie will bring some attention to one of America's most important (but long forgotten) Ufo incident of all time:

Movie Review:
The footage opens with a little background on the 1942 Battle of Los Angeles, when anti-aircraft artillery responded to reports of an unknown aircraft. It then switches to a more modern-day Los Angeles, clearly under enemy fire, although the nature of the fire isn't entirely clear. As the military evacuates LA, a Marine platoon is ordered to find a group of survivors and bring them back to the evacuation point. But time is short; the Armed Forces plan to bomb LA in just three hours, hoping to obliterate the invading army. The Marines clearly know little about these invaders, except that they are "not of this world."
Continue reading - source
 .. MGM's fictional Battle of LA website
Actual real news clippings from the Battle over Los Angeles back in 1942 :


Predating the Roswell incident in 1947 - americas most important Ufo incident - Just What was hovering above Los Angeles on February 25, 1942?
 MSNBC.com's Dara Brown has the story on this 65th anniversary of the 'Battle of L.A.':

The Battle of Los Angeles is the name given by contemporary news agencies to a sighting of one or more unidentified flying objects which took place from late February 24 to early February 25, 1942 in which eyewitness reports of an unknown object or objects over Los Angeles, California, triggered a massive anti-aircraft artillery barrage. The Los Angeles incident occurred less than three months after America's entry into World War II as a result of the attack on Pearl Harbor.


The following are excerpts from the primary front page story of the LA Times on February 26th. Note that there is not a SINGLE description of the object even though is was clearly locked in the focus of dozens of searchlights for well over half an hour and seen by hundreds of thousands of people:

Army officer "if 1000 rounds  of ammunition can't bring one plane down then their not planes"




Army Says Alarm Real  Roaring Guns Mark Blackout

Identity of Aircraft Veiled in Mystery; No Bombs Dropped and No Enemy Craft Hit; Civilians Reports Seeing Planes and Balloon

Overshadowing a nation-wide maelstrom of rumors and conflicting reports, the Army's Western Defense Command insisted that Los Angeles' early morning blackout and anti-aircraft action were the result of unidentified aircraft sighted over the beach area. In two official statements, issued while Secretary of the Navy Knox in Washington was attributing the activity to a false alarm and "jittery nerves," the command in San Francisco confirmed and reconfirmed the presence over the Southland of unidentified planes



Relayed by the Southern California sector office in Pasadena, the second statement read: "The aircraft which caused the blackout in the Los Angeles area for several hours this a.m. have not been identified." Insistence from official quarters that the alarm was real came as hundreds of thousands of citizens who heard and saw the activity spread countless varying stories of the episode. The spectacular anti-aircraft barrage came after the 14th Interceptor Command ordered the blackout when strange craft were reported over the coastline. Powerful searchlights from countless stations stabbed the sky with brilliant probing fingers while anti-aircraft batteries dotted the heavens with beautiful, if sinister, orange bursts of shrapnel.

City Blacked Out For Hours


The city was blacked out from 2:25 to 7:21 am after an earlier yellow alert at 7:18 pm was called off at 10:23 pm. The blackout was in effect from here to the Mexican border and inland to the San Joaquin Valley. No bombs were dropped and no airplanes shot down and, miraculously in terms of the tons of missiles hurled aloft, only two persons were reported wounded by falling shell fragments. Countless thousands of Southland residents, many of whom were late to work because of the traffic tie-up during the blackout, rubbed their eyes sleepily yesterday and agreed that regardless of the question of how "real" the air raid alarm may have been, it was "a great show" and "well worth losing a few hours' sleep." The blackout was not without its casualties, however. A State Guardsman died of a heart attack while driving an ammunition truck, heart failure also accounted for the death of an air raid warden on duty, a woman was killed in a car-truck collision in Arcadia, and a Long Beach policeman was killed in a traffic crash enroute to duty. Much of the firing appeared to come from the vicinity of aircraft plants along the coastal area of Santa Monica, Inglewood, Southwest Los Angeles, and Long Beach.

In its front page editorial, the Times said: "In view of the considerable public excitement and confusion caused by yesterday morning's supposed enemy air raid over this area and its spectacular official accompaniments, it seems to The Times that more specific public information should be forthcoming from government sources on the subject, if only to clarify their own conflicting statements about it."
"According to the Associated Press, Secretary Knox intimated that reports of enemy air activity in the Pacific Coastal Region might be due largely to 'jittery nerves.' Whose nerves, Mr. Knox? The public's or the Army's?"

2 comments:

Bathtub said...

This is one of the most intriguing of all ufo cases, imo. I don't buy the 'weather balloon' explanation (though it would account for failing to shoot it down: it would probably have been well out of the range of AA batteries). But given that America was on a war footing, and that only a few years previously Orson Welles had shown how easy it was to create mass panic with a radio broadcast of an entirely fictitious alien invasion, I do wonder whether this is a genuine ufo event or an example of mass hysteria. We'll probably never get to the bottom of it, but it's absolutely fascinating whatever the explanation.

Bathtub said...

This is one of the most intriguing of all ufo cases, imo. I don't buy the 'weather balloon' explanation (though it would account for failing to shoot it down: it would probably have been well out of the range of AA batteries). But given that America was on a war footing, and that only a few years previously Orson Welles had shown how easy it was to create mass panic with a radio broadcast of an entirely fictitious alien invasion, I do wonder whether this is a genuine ufo event or an example of mass hysteria. We'll probably never get to the bottom of it, but it's absolutely fascinating whatever the explanation.